Montessori Plus School Kent WA

Montessori Teacher Preparation Kent WA

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Montessori Language: A Quick List

Compliments of Junko Krause,

Revised by Sharlet McClurkin

CHOOSING WORK:
  1. “Would you like to choose your work?”
  1. “May I help you choose your work?”
  1. “We work in school.”
  1. “I will put this work away, and you may have a turn.”
  1. “You may sit here.”
  1. “I will show you a new lesson!”
  1. “I have some interesting work to show you!”
  1. “Would you like to see some special work?”

DURING THE WORK:

  1. “Would you like for me to help you carry it?”
  1. (Cleaning up a spill): “I will help you start, and you may finish.”
  1. “Can you find the items to match?”
  1. “Let us put this away and use it another day.”
  1. “I will put this away, and you may use it later.”
  1. “Accidents happen.”

ACTIVE LISTENING:

  1. “You are proud of your work!”

2.   “You are upset (left out, hurt, sad, angry, worried, lonely, etc.).”

GUIDANCE THROUGH WORDS:

  1. “We speak quietly in our school.”
  1. “We treat others with respect.”
  1. “We use our work carefully.”
  1. “We walk in our school.”
  1. “We choose work we have been shown.”
  1. “We roll our rug and carry it with two hands.”
  1. “We speak with grace and courtesy to others.”
  1. “You may choose your own work.”
  1. “In our school we do one work at a time.”
  1. “We dance outside; inside we do our work.”
  1. “We do not share in school.”
  1. “Please try it first, then I will help you.”

I -STATEMENTS:
1. “I am worried when you run through the school because I want you to be safe.”

2.  “When you hit Johnny, I am very sad because I want all children to feel safe and happy.”

3.  “I am upset when you kick me.  My leg hurts and I can’t teach the children!”

Montessori Language of Respect Seminar Available

 Who: 

Sharlet J. McClurkin:

  • Director of Montessori Plus School and Teacher Preparation of WA for thirty-six years.
  • MACTE commissioner for three years.
  • International trainer in China, Taiwan, Korea, the Philippines and Sri Lanka;
  • Current director and trainer for over seventy teachers-in-training in Kent, WA.

What:

Five-hour lecture, with “question and answers”

Sharlet McClurkin will paint a picture of joyful learning and respectful speech in this seminar. She will show in words, songs and actions how to rise above the challenges of the Montessori classroom and keep one’s calm and vision for the children.

The Montessori Language of Respect seminar will show the non-conventional language and methods of the Montessori teacher while working with children in a group activity or in the open classroom.  Mrs. McClurkin will also show adults how to present transition and songs of respect and self-confidence to children.  She will discuss the impact of negative words and phrases, as well as ordering and questioning, in the young child’s life.

The adults will learn how to listen to children with empathy and how to phrase a deep concern or feeling in a positive way.  They will also see special lessons in “grace and courtesy” that encourage an atmosphere of love and respect in the classroom.

Mrs. McClurkin will present problem scenarios, discuss “whose problem it is” and how to respond to the children in an authentic and human, yet respectful manner.

STARS’ hours available upon request.

When:

Upon request.  Suggested timeframe:  9 am to 12 noon; 1-3 pm

Where:

Montessori schools, upon request.

Cost:  To Be Arranged

Respectful Language and Actions in a Montessori School Seminar

(Seminars may be arranged by calling 253-859-2262)

  I.  MONTESSORI LANGUAGE OF RESPECT

A.  Joyful Learning and Respectful Speech

 Sharlet McClurkin will paint a picture of joyful learning and respectful speech in this seminar. She will show in words, songs and actions how to rise above the challenges of the Montessori classroom and keep one’s calm and vision for the children.

This seminar will demonstrate non-conventional language and methods of the Montessori teacher while working with children in a group activity or in the open classroom.

B.  Music of Respect; Roadblocks

Mrs. McClurkin will also show adults how to present transition songs and songs of respect and self-confidence to children.  She will discuss the impact of negative words and phrases, as well as ordering and question, in the young child’s life.

C.  Listening

Adults will learn how to listen to children with empathy and how to phrase a deep concern or feeling in a positive way.  They will see ways of speaking courteously and gracefully to children.

D.  Problem-solving

Mrs. McClurkin will present problem scenarios, discuss “whose problem it is” and how to respond to the children in an authentic and human, yet respectful manner.

II.  ACTIONS OF INTERVENTION

A.  When to intervene with a child. 

1.  How much intervention do I give to children?  What is the criterion for intervening?

2.  As a director, how much intervention do I give to children and teachers?  Do I correct them as I walk through the classroom?

3.  How much intervention do I give to interns?

B.  What is the difference between “managing” and “leading” a classroom?

1.  How can I find a balance between complete freedom for the children and my guidance of them?

2.  What is the difference between managing and leading them?

3.  What happens when I “micro-manage” all of the children?

4.  What happens when I “let them go”?

5.  What does Montessori mean that we must have the “eye of faith” toward children?

III.  FREEDOM OF CHOICE

A.  Why is freedom of choice essential for children in a Montessori school?

1.  How much freedom do I give 4.5 through 5 year-olds to choose their work?

2.  What is the place of practical life for 5-year-olds?

3.   What are some Montessori ways to encourage the older children to choose 5-year-old work?  What name may I call it?  (“harder,” “challenging,” etc?)

B.  What about freedom for teachers?

1.  How much freedom do I, as the director, give to teachers and interns to select their circle themes and to set up their classroom?

2.  Should there be a certain number of lessons that children and interns give each day?

3.  What happens when the teacher makes the work so that the child is only able to do part of it?

IV. DISCIPLINE

A.  What is discipline?

1.  What kind of discipline should Montessori children have?

2.  What are the three levels of obedience, according to Montessori?

B.  The “time-out”

1.  How long should time-outs be for children?

2.  What is the purpose of a time out?

3.  What steps are included in a “time-out”?

4.  Should children be required to say, “I’m sorry.”?

V.  COMPARISON

A.  Children: What happens when a teacher tells a child that they are not doing hard work like another child her age?

B.  Teachers/interns: What happens if you tell an intern that she is not doing as well as another intern?

VI. THE PURPOSE OF THE MONTESSORI CLASSROOM

A.  Setting your purpose

1.  Should the main purpose of the Montessori classroom be academic?

2.  How can I educate parents to know the purpose?

B.  The attraction of the “old” thinking

1.  What traditional philosophies and roadblocks can creep in so that the teachers, interns and children feel stress and pressure to perform?

2.  How can I have an atmosphere of joy of learning for all teachers, interns and teachers?

C.  How to have “joyful learning” every day in the classroom